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Golden Grass Artisans

D'OURO BOWL

Regular price
$48.00
Regular price
Sale price
$48.00
Style

HANDMADE IN TOCANTINS, BRAZIL

The D'ouro bowls are perfect for both decorative and utilitarian purposes. Crafted with rustic yet elegant design, and featuring a unique golden color from Brazilian bromeliad straws, these bowls are sure to make a statement.

These pieces hail from the Cerrado biome of Brazil, a tropical savannah where abundant bromeliad plants are cultivated for their naturally golden straw. Under strict harvesting regulations set in place in the 1920s to empower indigenous communities, plantations must yield the coveted raw material to local artisans. The artisans keep their indigenous and creative heritage alive, using time-honored weaving techniques to create one-of-a-kind artifacts and support their community.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL

DETAILS


Materials: Capim Dourado and urucum fiber

Dimensions:
- Round: 9.5 D x 6” H
- Oval: 12” L x 9" W x 5” H

** This item is artisan crafted with care. Given its handmade nature, variations are to be expected and celebrated. Each item is unique and no two are exactly alike. **

PRODUCT CARE

- If necessary, use a damp; cloth to spot clean.
- Keep out of direct sunlight for long periods of time

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MEET THE CREATOR

tocantins, Brazil

GOLDEN GRASS ARTISANS

The Golden Grass Artisans Association carries with it a rich history of tradition and mutual empowerment.

The association’s story begins with Mucumba Quilombola, a settlement founded by African and Afro-descended people who escaped slavery on the Brazilian coast. They started over in the Cerrado, a vast savanna in central Brasil. Local indigenous populations welcomed their new neighbors by sharing their knowledge, including the ancient craft of basket weaving made possible by the Cerrado’s abundant capim dourado, or golden grass.

Two decades ago, a group of Mucumba Quilombola’s women leaders formed the Mumbuca association with two aims: bolster their community by formalizing the creation and selling of their grass decor artifacts, and preserve the ancient craft by passing it on to future generations.

Today, the association's impact extends far beyond the craft itself. They have elevated their Afro-Indigenous traditions, improved the livelihoods of the entire community, and spearheaded discussions on the sustainability of native plants in the Cerrado region.