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Mano de Bae

IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE

Regular price
$110.00
Regular price
Sale price
$110.00

HANDMADE IN PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

Capture the imagination with the natural tones and hand-etched textures of this delightful mermaid sculpture. Inspired by Iemanjá, the goddess of the sea in African traditions, this sculpture serves as a symbol of protection over sailors, fishermen, families, and children.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL

DETAILS


Materials: Clay

Dimensions: 6” H x 8” L

** This item is artisan crafted with care. Given its handmade nature, variations are to be expected and celebrated. Each item is unique and no two are exactly alike. **

PRODUCT CARE

Dust gently with a feather duster or a soft, dry cloth

IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE
IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE
IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE
IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE
IEMANJA CERAMIC SCULPTURE

MEET THE CREATOR

PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

MANO DE BAÉ

“At one point, you start to see art as a means to protest, increase representation, and break paradigms and racism. I decided to bring this to my work. People were very resistant at first. I kept going because that’s why I am here, and that’s why I was chosen by the arts. It can’t be done any other way.”

You might say Mano de Bae is a renaissance man. In addition to being a master of ceramics, he is a poet, musician and activist. He represents a new generation of creators bringing the traditional craft of the Northeast of Brazil to the world with a fresh take. Mano’s work celebrates the beauty and richness of his community. He draws inspiration from his people’s daily lives—their dreams, beliefs, and traditions. Through Mano’s eyes, the ordinary person’s life is beautiful, full of creativity and imagination.

By combining traditional craftsmanship with a contemporary look, Mano uses his art to break paradigms and increase representation while firmly grounding his work in tradition. He’s just as likely to include elements of his Afro-indigenous ancestry—such as Orixas (deified ancestors from African-Brazilian religions), mermaids, or a Pajé (the spiritual leader and healer of an indigenous tribe)—as he is to center themes of gender representation and sexual orientation.

As a young child, Mano learned how to work with ceramics by helping his father, a famous craftsman and musician himself. Just like his father, Mano does not use molds to create his pieces—every detail is carefully made by hand, making each piece unique.