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Kamayurá People

KAMAYURA SET - SOL

Regular price
$92.00
Regular price
$0.00
Sale price
$92.00

HANDMADE IN MATO GROSS, BRAZIL

Kamayurá artisans weave intricate beadwork patterns into sophisticated jewelry, ensuring the preservation of their people's culture through their art.

The Kamayurá are an important reference in the indigenous cultural area of Alto Xingu, Mato Grosso, where speakers of different languages share similar worldviews and ways of life, connected by a system of specialized exchanges and inter-ethnic rituals.

For the Kamayurá and other indigenous peoples, the commercialization of handicrafts is not only important for generating sustainable income for their families but also for keeping this knowledge alive, passed down through generations, and promoting their culture to the world.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL

DETAILS


Materials: Mini beads

KAMAYURA SET - SOL
KAMAYURA SET - SOL
KAMAYURA SET - SOL

MEET THE CREATOR

Mato Grosso, Brazil

KAYAMURÁ PEOPLE

The Kamayurá are one of the fourteen indigenous ethnic groups in the Xingu National Park, in the state of Mato Grosso. The ethnic group has always remained in the same region, near the "big water," which is the meaning of Ipavu, the name given to the lagoon near the village.

According to the Brazilian government, in 2006, there were 492 Kamayurá indigenous people. This number represents a significant growth after a measles epidemic in the region in 1954, when only 94 people survived.

In the Kamayurá village, the "oca" constitutes a place dominated by women and children. The more inhabitants there are in the "oca," the more important the owner becomes, and thus, the more significant the support they can provide to the village leader. To become a leader, young candidates undergo strict discipline in the practices of being a "good Indian."

Another prominent element of Kamayurá culture is their rituals. The Kwarup, which means the feast of the dead; Jawari, the celebration of warriors; and Moitará, a gathering for gift exchanges among people – both indigenous and non-indigenous individuals can participate. In Jawari, the sport of arrow throwing symbolizes warrior activities. The physical fight known as Huka-Huka is also present in religious rituals.