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Karajá Artisans

KARAJA MARACAS

Regular price
$12.00
Regular price
$0.00
Sale price
$12.00

HANDMADE IN TOCANTINS, BRAZIL

Handcrafted from the cuieira fruit, this exquisite musical instrument serves as a rhythmic centerpiece for ceremonies and festivities on the Karajá communities. With its noble status and significance in religious rituals, the maraca embodies cultural heritage and spiritual connection. Beyond its musical prowess, this visually stunning decor artifact adds a touch of elegance and cultural richness to any space, captivating the senses and celebrating the essence of tradition.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL 

 

DETAILS


Materials: cuieira tree fruit, natural pigments and sustainably sourced wood.

Dimensions: 10" L x 5" W

** This item is artisan crafted with care. Given its handmade nature, variations are to be expected and celebrated. Each item is unique and no two are exactly alike. **

PRODUCT CARE

- Avoid contact with water.
- Do not use chemical products for cleaning.
- Dust gently with a feather duster or a soft, dry cloth
- Do not leave the piece exposed to sunlight or weather conditions.

KARAJA MARACAS
KARAJA MARACAS
KARAJA MARACAS

MEET THE CREATOR

Mato Grosso, Brazil

KARAJÁ PEOPLE

The Karajá people, one of the most well-known indigenous ethnic groups in Brazil, originally inhabited regions along the Araguaia River in the states of Pará, Tocantins, Mato Grosso, and Goiás. Currently, the most important settlement is located on Bananal Island in Tocantins. The estimated total population of the Karajá people is around 3,200 people.

Despite facing the impacts of Western colonization, this group has managed to preserve their customs relatively well over the years. Such cultural vitality is mainly due to the belief in keeping a good cosmic order among the three realms of existence - the earthly, the heavenly, and the underwater - through the enactment of traditional cyclical rites.

The Karajá people believe in supernatural beings, inhabitants of the sky, woods, and water. Only shamans, who possess the power to travel to the sky and the depths of the river in life and after death, can perceive them. The Karajá also believe in the survival of the souls of the deceased.

Vocal music and dancing are integral to Karajá culture, with rhythms marked by the maraca (werú), a gourd rattle used in rituals. Chants sung in falsetto create the impression that the dancers embody non-human beings. These chants encompass Karajá history, everyday life, and mythical and cosmological affairs.