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Krahô Artisans

KRAHO BRACELET II

Regular price
$35.00
Regular price
Sale price
$35.00

HANDMADE IN TOCANTINS, BRAZIL

Before becoming perfect beads, the seeds of "tiririca" are processed through the ancestral knowledge of the Mehin artisans. It's an extremely meticulous work that begins with the collection of "tiririca" (a plant full of thorns, also known as 'razor-grass') and is carried out by the women of the Pedra Branca village. It can take weeks between the separation, drilling, and roasting process of the seeds until the completion of these bio-jewels, which possess a unique and exclusive design, as well as high durability.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL

DETAILS


Materials: Tiririca seeds and mini beads

KRAHO  BRACELET II
KRAHO  BRACELET II
KRAHO  BRACELET II
KRAHO  BRACELET II

MEET THE CREATOR

tocantins, brazil

KRAHÔ PEOPLE

The Krahô people, an indigenous Timbira Gê group from northeastern Brazil, have a unique history and rich cultural heritage. Over two centuries ago, they encountered Western civilization. Initially, conflicts arose as they defended their lands against cattle farmers. Eventually, a peaceful relationship was established.

Despite their population declining to 500 by the 1970s, the Krahô population has been growing since 1986, reaching 2,000 individuals by 2007. They maintain their customs and rituals, with houses covered in palm leaves and baskets made of buriti leaves used for storage.

The village is arranged in a circular formation, with a central courtyard called "ká" where important discussions and decisions for the community take place. Their rituals are based on the belief in the "balance of opposites." The Krahô tribe celebrates the summer harvest with the "potato festival (panti)" and commemorates the abundance of the corn harvest with the "corn festival (pônhê)," considered sacred. They also cultivate cassava, peanuts, and pumpkins. Couples are responsible for cultivating and preparing the fields for their families. 

The log race is a cherished ritual in the Krahô tribe, involving the participation of both men and women. During the race, the community divides into two groups: one representing the "half of the rising sun" and the other representing the "half of the setting sun." The race takes place after hunting, fishing, and harvesting activities. The log is passed from one runner to another, symbolizing cooperation and unity within the community.