Skip to product information
1 of 4

Waxamani Mehinako

MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS

Regular price
$65.00
Regular price
$0.00
Sale price
$65.00
Style

HANDMADE IN MATO GROSSO, BRAZIL

Carefully handcrafted, these wooden spatulas are skillfully carved and painted to resemble the native animals found in the lush forests of the Mehinako community, including herons, mutuns, and monkeys.

While traditionally used for flipping beiju (tapioca) in the pan, these paddles also serve as captivating wall decorations, adding a unique and vibrant touch to your home. Let these intricately designed pieces spark conversations and showcase your appreciation for indigenous artistry.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL 

DETAILS


Materials: Natural pigments on sustainably sourced wood

Dimensions: 5” H x 15.5” L

** This item is artisan crafted with care. Given its handmade nature, variations are to be expected and celebrated. Each item is unique and no two are exactly alike. **

PRODUCT CARE

- Avoid contact with water.
- Do not use chemical products for cleaning.
- Dust gently with a feather duster or a soft, dry cloth
- Do not leave the piece exposed to sunlight or weather conditions.

MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS
MEHINAKO WOODEN ANIMALS

MEET THE CREATOR

Mato Grosso, Brazil

WAXAMANI MEHINAKO

“My goal is to bring my people’s art to non-indigenous people and show that our art is not only for us. I also want to help pass down our ancestral ways to the next generation.”

Deep in Brazil's heart, nestled in the Alto Xingu indigenous territory, resides Waxamani, an artist blurring the lines between his Mehinako and Aweti heritage and the contemporary art world. He crafts vibrant paintings, their colors and graphic patterns echoing the very pigments and motifs used to adorn bodies during sacred celebrations.

Inspired by the vibrant tapestry of fauna and flora surrounding him, Waxamani extracts these pigments from his land, weaving them into captivating canvases. No brushes or rulers constrain him; instead, generations-old stories flow through his every stroke, transforming these earthy hues and traditional symbols into living tapestries. These aren't mere paintings; they're cultural narratives etched in color, connecting the past to the present, the artist to his community, and each vibrant mark to a profound heritage.