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Forest Association Artisans

WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE

Regular price
$15.00
Regular price
Sale price
$15.00
Size

HANDMADE IN AMAZONAS, BRAZIL

Spruce up your storage with these stunning baskets handcrafted by a group of talented women who turn cauaçu stems into beautiful works of art using natural dyes and traditional patterns. These baskets are not just functional, but also a unique display of transformative creativity.

25% OF PROFITS GO TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN BRAZIL

DETAILS


Materials: Cauçu fiber and natural pigments

Dimensions:
Small: 10.5" x 10.5"
Medium: 15" x 15"


** This item is artisan crafted with care. Given its handmade nature, variations are to be expected and celebrated. Each item is unique and no two are exactly alike. **

PRODUCT CARE

- Style indoors in a dry place.
- Dust with a microfiber cloth to clean if necessary.
- Baskets will darken slightly and become more firm with age.

WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE
WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE
WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE
WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE
WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE
WOVEN BASKET - SQUARE

MEET THE CREATOR

amazonas, brazil

FOREST ASSOCIATION

In the highlands of the Amazon, within the municipality of Amanā, a group of 32 women engages in the transformative art of turning cauaçu stems into both utilitarian and decorative pieces. The cauaçu plant, boasting large and elongated fibers that can extend up to 1.8 meters, is sustainably harvested in its natural habitat. The intricate process commences with the careful cutting of the stem, followed by the removal of its bark and a thorough sun-drying phase. Once the fibers achieve dryness, they undergo a vibrant transformation through dyeing, employing native flora such as crajiru for lively red hues, turmeric for intense yellows, and indigo for a rich wine color.

In the subsequent stages, the fibers are expertly cut to standardized sizes necessary for the production of each piece, ensuring adherence to established standards. Meticulous attention is given to the finishing touches, securing any loose ends, and culminating in the application of andiroba oil for an enhanced luster and increased durability.

Amanā, with its population of 4,000 inhabitants, thrives primarily through subsistence activities. The community engages in agriculture, hunting, fishing, as well as the extraction of vines, copaiba, and andiroba oils, along with the harvesting of wild fruits.